EDUCAUSE

EDUCAUSE 2016 Highlights

cvnpwc8ukai_tueWith over 8,000 attendees, the EDUCAUSE Annual Conference is one of the premier events each year bringing together the best of technology, teaching, and learning.

This year, the EDUCAUSE Annual Conference was held in Anaheim, California at the convention center.  The event began with pre-conference sessions on Tuesday, October 25th, which was followed by 2 and 1/2 days of sessions.

The conference included nearly 300 exhibitors, keynotes by Susan Cain, best-selling author, speaker, and co-founder of Quiet Revolution and Sugatra Mitra, Professor of Educational Technology at Newcastle University in England, and a large variety of breakout sessions that covered the following program tracks:

  • Driving Innovation in Teaching and Learning
  • Enabling the Data-Driven Decision-Making Environment
  • Innovating in IT Infrastructure and Cloud-Based IT Environments
  • Leading and Partnering Strategically across the Academy
  • Producing, Distributing, and Using Digital-based Knowledge
  • Reducing and Managing Risk in a Digital World
  • Transforming the Student Experience

Consolidating the breakout session titles into a tag cloud highlighted the following keywords: “learning, student, education, technology, service”

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Here are several highlights from the conference:

“The most successful students are those who access MyGrades most frequently; students doing poorly do not access their grades. Students who never access their grades are more likely to fail than students who access them at least once.”

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About the EDUCAUSE Annual Conference:

The EDUCAUSE Annual Conference is the premier convening of IT professionals and technology providers across the diverse higher education landscape. The conference creates networking opportunities for colleagues to share ideas regarding strategies, leading change, effective processes, what’s working, and sometimes—more importantly—what isn’t.

EDUCAUSE 2016 represents the best thinking in higher education IT.

Showcase @GVSU makes @EDUCAUSELI @NMCorg Horizon Report Video Competition

showcaseNMCvideoAn Atomic Object Technology Showcase video (produced by the Digital Studio in eLearning and Emerging Technologies) made it to the ELI NMC Horizon Report Video Competition!

Located in room 012 of the Mary Idema Pew Library Learning and Information Commons, the showcase at Grand Valley State University is on mission to accelerate the topic of emerging technologies and their use in teaching and learning. Be sure to visit the showcase to see and interact with the latest technologies including: 3D printing, augmented and virtual reality, wearable and gesture computing, and more!

Each year, the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative joins forces with the New Media Consortium to prepare a report that highlights the latest in trends in #EdTech.

The 2016 Higher Education Preview is now available and it highlights the following emerging technologies across 3 adoption trend time frames (view full report – PDF):

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ECAR Study of Students and Technology @ GVSU

EDUCAUSE has recently released the 2015 “ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology” that provides insight into students and their use of technology in education.  This research has been ongoing since 2004 with 970,000 students from 161 institutions participating in this year’s survey.

This was the first year for GVSU to participate in this research study. In fact, there were 50,274 respondents from 11 countries and 43 states that participated in the 2015 ECAR survey.

The following is a summary of the key study areas with the resulting key findings:

  • Technology Experiences – More than ever, students are using technology and are generally positive in reporting their experiences. Technology has had a moderate influence in the students’ active involvement in classes.
  • Technology Ownership and the Campus Environment – More students than ever own devices that are web enabled.
  • Mobile Devices and Student Learning – While mobile devices carry a high level of interest, the use of these in education is low.
  • Technology Resources and Tools – There is evidence that technologies are not integrated for their full potential in education.
  • Analytics and Data Privacy – The majority of students see the institutional use of data as important in tracking their academic progress.
  • New Models for Education – MOOCs and competency-based education haven’t yet impacted undergraduates while:

“The majority of students say they learn best with a blend of online and face-to-face work.”


Here are a few highlights from the report, along with GVSU’s results that include benchmarks.

FACULTY USE OF TECHNOLOGY

For comparison, at GVSU, the results included the following:


USE OF LMS and COLLABORATION TOOLS

The follow graphs highlight the use of the Blackboard (LMS) and Collaboration Tools (eg. Blackboard Collaborate, etc.).

When students were surveyed as part of the ECAR study, 94% indicated that Blackboard was used in at least one of their courses with 54% reporting that all of their classes used an LMS.

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UseBbWish

When faculty at GVSU were asked in the ECAR study about their use of the LMS, they reported the following:

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When faculty were asked how often they typically use Blackboard, they indicated the following:BbOftenUse

Over 81% of faculty surveyed in the ECAR study at GVSU indicated the Blackboard was a very useful tool to enhance their teaching.BbValue.jpg

Similarly, when faculty were asked if the LMS is a very useful tool to enhance student learning, more than 74% agreed.

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Also asked in the study, was the use of online collaboration tools in courses.  Here are the results from the study:

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MOBILE

In addition to the use of the LMS and online collaboration tools, the importance of mobile access to campus resources was highlighted in the report.  Most notable was the importance of checking grades, content, and accessing the LMS (eg. Blackboard).


EXPECTATIONS AND USE OF TECHNOLOGY

Importance of using technology and expectations for use by students was another highlight.  The top 4 included: search tools, LMS use (eg. Blackboard), online collaboration tools, and the use of laptops during class.


EXPERIENCE TAKING ONLINE COURSES

Finally, students were asked if they have taken a completely online class in the past year, and if they have ever taken and online course before.  The results are revealed in the charts below:

Related to these data above, GVSU currently offers a wide array of courses and degree programs in the online and hybrid format.  There are approximately 150 courses and just over 3,500 total student enrollments in distance education courses as of the Fall semester 2015.  In fact, this represents a 91% increase in enrollment since 2011 with 12% of students at GVSU taking at least 1 online/hybrid course.  In addition, over 500 faculty have been certified to teach online/hybrid courses through the Foundations course that is offered through IDeL and the FTLC. Finally, online and hybrid learning connects to GVSU’s 2021 Strategic Plan in objectives 3.D.2 and 3.D.3.


What are your thoughts about these results and the opportunities that are provided by leveraging technology in teaching and learning?

EDUCAUSE Top 10 IT Issues and eLearning @ GVSU

Each year, EDUCAUSE releases the “Top 10 IT Issues and Strategic Technologies” report that will be released in January 2016.

The top 10 IT issues of 2016 are:

Reviewing the issues list from EDUCAUSE, the following areas are key in our mission and vision in our eLearning and Emerging Technologies group at GVSU:

#2 – Optimizing Educational Technology

#3 – Student Success Technologies

#10 – E-Learning and Online Education

Specifically, our mission is squarely targeted in the aforementioned areas for supporting faculty and students in traditional instruction as well as advancing our work as a university in online and hybrid classes.

Our eLearning and Emerging Technologies Mission Statement:

“eLearning and Emerging Technologies is dedicated to supporting faculty, contributing to teaching excellence, and enhancing student success through: exemplary instructional design, effective application and integration of instructional technologies, interactive digital media development, administration and enhancement of the university’s enterprise course management system (Blackboard), and the deployment of new innovative emerging technologies.”

Additionally, we are aligning our work to the GVSU 2021 Strategic Plan in the following areas:

Strategic Priority Area 1: Actively engage learners at all levels.

Institutional outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 1.D.2: At least 20% of faculty members use state-of-the-art instructional methods and technologies in their teaching. Baseline: Education Center for Analysis and Research preliminary data is being collected for 2014-15, available June 2015.

Strategic Priority Area 2: Further develop exceptional personnel.

Institutional outcome E: Grand Valley strategically allocates its fiscal, human, and other institutional resources.

Objective 2.E.1: At least 75% of faculty and 75% of staff participate in professional development to expand, enhance or extend their competencies and capabilities within the context of the responsibilities of their positions. Baseline for faculty will be determined via Digital Measures in summer 2015. Baseline for Fall 2014 for staff is 50-55%.

Strategic Priority 3: Ensure the alignment of institutional structures and functions.

Institutional outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 3.D.2: At least 30% of undergraduate courses are offered in innovative approaches and formats, such as hybrid, online and competency-oriented. Baseline for undergraduate courses for Fall 2014 is 6%.

Objective 3.D.3: At least 30% of graduate courses are offered in innovative approaches and such as hybrid, online and competency-oriented. Baseline for graduate courses for Fall 2014 is 25%.

Strategic Priority 4: Enhance the institution’s image and reputation.

Institutional outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies

Objective 4.D.1:Effective technologies are integrated into every function and structure across the institution. Baseline: In 2013, IT implementation was above the median on 24 of 49 indicators across 7 functional domains.

As we look into the future, we are excited by the potential and looking forward to supporting faculty in the delivery of the next generation of teaching and learning!

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#EDU15 – Technology Showcase featured in EDUCAUSE Session

The Atomic Object Technology Showcase at Grand Valley State University was recently highlighted in a preconference seminar for the EDUCAUSE Annual Conference on October 27.  The session title was: Working with Emerging Technologies to Promote Engaging Learning. This session featured a panel of 12 presenters from 8 colleges and universities including: University of Oregon, Pennsylvania State University, Berry College, University of Miami, University of Central Florida, Glendale Community College, California State University, and Grand Valley State University.

Eric Kunnen, Associate Director of eLearning and Emerging Technologies, talked about GVSU’s radically student-centered Mary Idema Pew Library Learning and Information Commons and the value it provides for students and faculty to bring about opportunities to experience emerging technology through the Technology Showcase!

Here are the slides from the session: