Author: stgermav

eLearning and Instructional Technology Specialist at Grand Valley State University, Allendale, Michigan

Ten Ways to Use Video in Your Classroom

This year’s Michigan Association for Computer Users in Learning (MACUL) conference was filled with three days of intense, hands-on learning experiences centered on the practice of integrating technology and learning.

Presenting at the conference was Jason Valade, Customer Success Manager at TechSmith on “10 Ways to Use Video in Your Classroom”. Jason is a former elementary school teacher and Technology Lead whose love for “all things” video led him to TechSmith and their Customer Success Team.

During the session, Jason ran down his favorite top 10 uses for video in education and showed examples of how both video novices and experts can easily create video content to enhance instruction and engage students.

Tech Symposium

  1. Flip a Lesson

Rather than using class time to introduce new content, record a series of short videos that students can review on their own and then come to class prepared to extend the learning.

  1. Teach when you are Absent

Unable to attend a class, create a video review of that day’s related topics and assignments.

  1. Personalized Feedback

Use a desktop recording application to capture annotations and your voice as you provide feedback on assignments or use a document camera to record your voice while you manually mark up a printed assignment.

  1. Parent / Community Classroom

Post a video update for parents or the community by recording a PPT or Google presentation with the latest class information and achievements.

  1. Stop Repeating Yourself

Don’t keep responding to the same old questions over and over again, create a library of short how-to videos that can be used year-to-year.

  1. Give a Course Overview

Great at the beginning of the semester or when starting a new topic.

  1. Introduce Yourself

Build instructor presence and community. Perfect for online classes.

  1. Walk through Materials

Create a tutorial to review a complex procedure, demonstrate a process or solve a problem.

  1. Authentic Assessment

Let students storyboard, shoot and edit a video for review by the entire class.

  1. Filming Experiments

Use for review, as part of a quiz or other assessment.

Video recordings are quickly becoming a key component in any classroom, whether it’s face-to-face or online, video can be the catalyst that spurs a student’s imagination and learning.

Video Reflective Journals

Literature has shown that critical thinking enhances the learning process and that reflective practices enhance critical thinking. Together, better connections and meaning can be drawn from course materials and subjects, leading to enhanced understanding and a more satisfying learning experience for students.

For Grand Valley State University Professor Michael Ricco the use of Video Reflective Journals or “VRJs”, as he and his students like to call them, can easily bridge this gap. Offering faculty a better understanding of individual student needs and interests while providing students with a lifelong learning artifact that they can continuously return to for inspiration, the “VRJ” model has proven to be a valuable tool for both teacher and student.

See the entire interview.

To learn more about Video Reflective Journals, including an overview of the student survey data collected by Professor Ricco, plan on attending the 15th Annual Teaching and Learning with Technology Symposium on Wednesday, March 23, from 1-4pm in the Mary Idema Pew Library Learning and Information Commons on the Allendale campus of Grand Valley State University.